Monday, December 10th, 2018

Does Baseball Face a “Passion Gap”?

August 1, 2010 by  
Filed under Baseball History

Did you know that the National Baseball Hall of Fame is an independent entity that is neither owned nor operated by Major League Baseball?  A friend of mine recently wondered aloud if someone could open up their own rival Hall of Fame. If they didn’t actually use the name Hall of Fame, could they get away with it?

Would anyone come to visit?  Where would you open it?  Could you franchise the brand name out like Burger King?

Perhaps most importantly, could you persuade former players to actively participate in Induction Ceremonies and other events, to add credibility?

O.K., so that’s enough questions.  Now let’s brainstorm some possible answers.  I don’t see why an imaginative entrepreneur couldn’t test the market of baseball nostalgia by creating some sort of baseball theme park.

It could contain many interactive features such as allowing customers to create their own Virtual, customized Hall of Fame plaques of their favorite players, or even of their favorite people.  It could include a Nostalgia Room, complete with baseball items that would be both for display purposes and for sale.

It could have a children’s reading room, where a staff member  could read baseball themed stories to children while their parents wandered around shopping.  It could also include a baseball-themed restaurant where you could order the Cal Ripken Iron Man Special (all the baby-back ribs you could eat for $24.99.)

And yes, for a fee, ex-baseball players would sign on and make appearances.

Look, the point is this.  The Baseball Hall of Fame was founded over 70 years ago, but it doesn’t have to function like it did 70 years ago, or even twenty years ago, for that matter.  The average baseball fan/consumer today is a lot different than the “Average Joe” was back when Hammerin’ Hank Greenburg was terrorizing American league pitching or even when Dale Murphy won his consecutive MVP awards in the early ’80′s.

For one thing, baby-boomers, the single largest driving force behind baseball nostalgia since Mickey Mantle retired, aren’t getting any younger.   Younger demographics, in particular Gen Xers, don’t hold baseball in the same reverential awe as their parents and uncles once did.  Baseball may still be important to them, but it competes with many other entertainment options, video games, skateboards, and the omni-present world wide web.

 As we know, Baseball, with its 162 game season, is a long, steady marathon, given to serious fandom.  However, when compared to some other current sports (e.g. NASCAR, NFL, MMA) there is a passion gap. 

Baseball in general, and the Hall of Fame in particular, needs to face the fact that there is a demographic storm just over the horizon.  Baseball’s marketing plan still appears geared to white, upper middle class white males, mostly over the age of 40.  This is a permanently shrinking passionate customer base.

America is becoming increasingly Hispanic (or Latino, the term MLB prefers to use.)  More residents are foreign born than at any time since the 1920′s.  Thousands of immigrants and their children have never been to a baseball game, at least in part because of the expense.

So how to reconcile this inevitable demographic sea change with baseball’s long suit, its mythological connection to the past?  Well, for one thing, let’s start by simplifying the existing infrastructure of the game.  Here are some specific suggestions, in no particular order:

1.  Combine the Veterans Committee and the Baseball Writers Association of America into one voting committee, and expand it to include, ready for this?  The Fans.

Yes, that means you and me, folks.  Not as a direct one-person, one-vote head count, but as a weighted part of the overall vote total for each player that appears on the ballot.  We get to choose our president, don’t we?  We get to vote for contestants on “American Idol,” right?  So why not the Hall of Fame?

Baseball is a business, and we are the customers.  Anyway, we would comprise just one segment of the voting committee.  And yes, I am talking about on-line voting.

2.  Do away with the fifteen years on the ballot rule, a truly arbitrary feature of this entire process if there ever was one.  Currently, there is no question that some writers simply “kick the can” down the road, as it were, year after year, so they don’t really have to make the tough decision about a Jim Rice or someone else.

How is this process a good marketing strategy for baseball?  And to what extent does this process undermine the integrity of the Hall of Fame?

3.  Finally, Hall of Fame voters should have to publicly explain why they felt that, for example, Willie Mays did not deserve their vote.  It is ridiculous that several obvious Hall of Fame players received less than 90 percent of votes cast.

Examples:  Bob Gibson, 84%, Jimmie Foxx, 79%, Walter Johnson, 83% and my favorite example, Cy Young, 76%, meaning the man for whom baseball’s annual award for best pitcher is named just barely made it into The Hall.    What’s with that?

5.  Finally, unrelated to The Hall (at this point), but directly related to the changing demographics of baseball, begin seriously marketing America’s least appreciated natural resource, Albert Pujols.

He is already one of the top dozen players of all time, and the Hispanic community has to be wondering how a player this great can simply be so generally ignored by so-called “mainstream” America.

America is changing.  Can America’s National Pastime keep up with the changes, or will baseball in general, and the Hall of Fame in particular, one day become like the cloistered monasteries of old, where sallow men scratch out names of long-forgotten players on crumbling parchment, to be remembered by no one?

Learn More About How the Hall of Fame Was Established

A Great Day in Cooperstown: The Improbably Birth of Baseball’s Hall of Fame by Jim Reisler

Using an iconic photo of the Hall of Fame’s original inductees—including Babe Ruth, Cy Young, Honus Wagner, and Connie Mack—as his starting point, Jim Reisler explains the unusual origins of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. In the process, Reisler delivers a history of not only the game’s early stars and the house built to honor them, but also the creation of the myth of baseball in America.

With his trademark eye and ear for the spirit of the game’s golden age, Reisler explains that the construction of the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York was as much an attempt to revive the economy of a struggling draught-ravaged farming town at the height of the Depression as it was a tribute to the national pastime. The brain child of Stephen Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, and business man Alexander Cleland, the museum was a seemingly simple enough plan from a logistical perspective (as “an interesting museum” full of “funny old uniforms”), but actually required a strategic blend of bureaucratic maneuvering, creative storytelling, and good old fashioned panache to pull-off.

A Great Day in Cooperstown will be cherished by baseball fans and Americana enthusiasts alike.


Bill Miller writes a blog called The On Deck Circle, which features commentary and analysis on baseball issues, players, and teams both past and present. It also includes memories of sandlot ball, and classic baseball videos.

A baseball fan since 1974 when he first set foot in Shea Stadium, he is an avid collector of baseball cards, and has been an activemember in the same fantasy baseball league since 1993. Bill is also a member of the Baseball Bloggers Alliance (BBA).

Born and raised in New England, Bill now calls Greenville, S.C. (home of Shoeless Joe Jackson) his home, along with his wife and two boys. Bill hopes that his seven-year old son develops better strike-zone judgment than Jeff Francoeur.

Comments

4 Responses to “Does Baseball Face a “Passion Gap”?”
  1. Mark Mariniello says:

    Baseball is a wonderful game.I’ve been in love with the game ever since I opened my first pack of baseball cards in April of 1973.Countless spring and summer afternoons were spent playing ball and trading our cards.
    Now reality.The scumbag owners,players,agents,tv execs,and our fearless (or clueless) commissioner can’t let a day go by without trying to screw the very fans that fill their ballparks,buy their jerseys and mindlessly hang on every word they say.People have to WAKE UP!The people that run baseball,play baseball and televise baseball do not give a shit about you.They want your money.
    Well off my soapbox.Not everyone in the game is like this,but the majority are.I get mad when teams like my beloved Mets constantly feed their fanbase lies.I understand its a business and the goal in busisness is to make money.The best way to make money is to win!The old saying goes “you have to spend money to make money” doesn’t apply to the Mets and to a lot of other teams.
    I love the game of baseball.It brings me back to my childhood and the wonderful memories I had.No matter how much they try and screw up the game,they CAN’T kill the game.Men my age (42) are I think,hanging on to what makes them love the game.The backyard catches with their sons,the first dates with their future wives at ballgames,and their daughter’s first Mr. MET doll.
    Play Ball!

  2. Bill Miller says:

    Hi Mark, I agree with you, of course, that baseball is a wonderful game. Like you, I began collecting baseball cards in the early ’70’s, and like you, I am over 40. I play ball with my two young sons, and I hope they grow up loving and enjoying the game as much as I do. But, as my article suggests, I believe there are some problems just over the horizon for MLB. A combination of demographic changes, poor marketing schemes, and lack of effective leadership could render baseball just another thing to do, as opposed to something special to be loved and cherished, a generation from now. That doesn’t mean that I think that baseball will “die” or disappear. But a slide into gradual irrelevance isn’t out of the question.
    Meanwhile, let’s just continue to enjoy what we have with this great game, and hope our kids love it as much as we do.
    Thanks for reading, Bill

  3. Kevin G says:

    Bill,

    Congratulations on your new side job. I recommend A Great Day In Cooperstown for anyone who wants to know about the origins of this great museum.

    1. Combine the Veterans Committee and the Baseball Writers Association of America into one voting committee, and expand it to include, ready for this? The Fans.
    I couldn’t disagree more. Keep the fans out of the vote. We would only make it worse.

    2. Do away with the fifteen years on the ballot rule, a truly arbitrary feature of this entire process if there ever was one.
    What type of time limit would you like to see?

    3. Finally, Hall of Fame voters should have to publicly explain why they felt that, for example, Willie Mays did not deserve their vote. It is ridiculous that several obvious Hall of Fame players received less than 90 percent of votes cast.
    Examples: Bob Gibson, 84%, Jimmie Foxx, 79%, Walter Johnson, 83% and my favorite example, Cy Young, 76%, meaning the man for whom baseball’s annual award for best pitcher is named just barely made it into The Hall. What’s with that?
    I totally agree……some writers like to use their non-votes as some kind of political statement.
    That’s fine, but I want to know why you didn’t vote for Greg Maddox.

    5. Finally, unrelated to The Hall (at this point), but directly related to the changing demographics of baseball, begin seriously marketing America’s least appreciated natural resource, Albert Pujols.

    Albert doesn’t get enough exposure, he should be all over MLB advertisements.

    Bill, I know you live on the East coast, and it must piss you off when the playoffs and the World Series don’t start until 8:40. How does your 7 year old grow to love a game when their asleep on the couch by the 3rd inning. These games could and should start at 7 without losing any revenue.

    Kevin

  4. Bill Miller says:

    Hi Kevin, Glad you found me over here. It is extremely annoying about the late-night West Coast games, or even the East Coast games, for that matter. My seven-year old will be more like seventeen years old before he probably ever gets to see a complete World Series game. Great way to make new fans.
    As for the fifteen year rule for Hall voting, I would shorten it to five years, or, conversely, have no time limit at all. Let’s use the Nobel Prize, for example. Winners have no idea that they are even being considered. Therefore, if they don’t win one, there is no heart-ache. A sub-committee of baseball voters could make secret annual nominations, then once they are voted upon, only the winners get to know they’ve even been considered. The current system only encourages posturing and self-promotion among prospective candidates (former ballplayers.) A book called “Cooperstown Confidential” by Zev Chafets, which just came out about a year ago, describes this in great detail, using Goose Gossage’s induction as Exhibit A.
    Finally, Pujols will probably already be on the downside of his career before MLB even notices that he was marketable. I honestly think they are looking for the next Great White Hope. Look at the hype surrounding Stephen Strasburg. Strasburg has a chance to be great, but so, too, do David Price, Francisco Liriano, and others.
    Glad you stopped by for a visit, and, as usual, thanks for reading. Bill

Speak Your Mind

Tell us what you're thinking...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!

Better Tag Cloud